Low Back Pain

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Low Back Pain (LBP) affects about 40% of people sometime in their lives. This pain can vary from mild to severe. Acute or short-term low back pain generally last from a few days to a few weeks. Low back pain that persists for more than 3 months is considered chronic. Regardless of how long it lasts, it can make everyday activities difficult to do.

The low back bears most of the body’s weight so it is pretty easy to hurt your back when you lift, reach or twist. In addition, as people age, bone strength, muscle elasticity and tone tend to decrease. The discs begin to lose fluid and flexibility, which decreases their ability to cushion the vertebrae.

Pain can occur when, for example, someone lifts something too heavy or overstretches, causing a sprain, strain, or spasm in one of the muscles or ligaments in the back. If the spine becomes overly strained or compressed, a disc may rupture or bulge outward. This rupture may put pressure on one of the more than fifty nerves rooted to the spinal cord that control body movements and transmit signals from the body to the brain. When these nerve roots become compressed or irritated, back pain results.

Depending on the cause, low back pain can cause a range of symptoms. The pain may be dull or sharp. It may be in one small area or over a broad area. You may have muscle spasms. Low back pain can also cause leg symptoms, such as pain, numbness, or tingling, often extending below the knee.

Seventy percent of low back pain is thought to be due to muscle strain or injury to ligaments. We can provide a clear diagnosis and appropriate treatment.